DICTUM

keywords Ab

  • ABSCHNITT
  • Wenn man die Abschnitte von seinen Nägeln säete, es würden Backwaaren daraus wachsen.
    info] Spott auf die, so alles besser wissen wollen.
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  • ABSCHRIFT
  • Ah, da bitt' ich um eine Abschrift. - Vorstadt- Zeitung, 1875.
    info] Damit protestirt der Wiener gegen irgendeine starke Zumuthung.
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  • ABSCHÜSSIG
  • Er ist sehr abschüssig gebaut.
    info] Vom Trunkenen.
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  • ABSCHÜTTELN
  • Er schüttelt alles ab. - Tendlau, 375.
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  • ABSCHÜTTELN
  • Er schüttelt es ab, wie der Pudel die Flöhe. (Köthen.)
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  • ABSCHÜTTELN
  • Er schüttelt, es ab, wie der Hund den Regen.
    info] In Bedburg: Dat schött dä av, wie der Honk den Rähn.
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  • ABSCHÜTTELN
  • He schüddelt 't af as 'n Waterhund.
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  • ABSCHÜTTELN
  • He schüttet et af, as de Pracher (Bettler) de Luus. (Holst.)
    info] Wenn jemand irgendein Ungemach, z.B. empfangene Schläge, auch Kummer, Gram u.s.w. bald überwindet, gleichsam abschüttelt.
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  • ABSCHÜTTELN
  • He spud 't af, as Pudel den Regen. (Ovelgönne, Stadland in Oldenburg.) - Firmenich, III, 25.
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  • ABSCHWITZEN
  • Abschwitzen ist besser als abfaulen.
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  • ABSCHWÖREN
  • Er schwört dem Teufel ein Ohr ab.
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  • ABSEHEN
  • Kann öck mîn Endke afsêne, wär öck et ôk aftêne, kutsch' Koppke, noch e Wîlke. (Wehlau.) - Frischbier, II, 21.
    info] Worte einer schlaflustigen Bäuerin beim Flachsziehen. (S. Uebersehen 5.)
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  • ABSENCE
  • Absence is a foe to love; away from the eyes, away from the heart.
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  • ABSENCE
  • Absence is a foe to love; out of sight out of mind.
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  • ABSENCE
  • Absence is a foil to love.
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  • ABSENCE
  • Absence makes the heart grow fonder but makes the mind forget.
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  • ABSENCE
  • Absence makes the heart grow fonder.
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  • ABSENCE
  • A benefit may be conferred, but not a disability imposed, on a man in his absence.
    Judah b. llai. Mishna. Erubin, 7.11.
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  • ABSENCE
  • Absence lessens ordinary passions and augments great ones, as the wind blows out a candle and makes a fire blaze.
    LA ROCHEFOUCAULD
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  • ABSENCE
  • Absence makes the heart grow frozen, not fonder.
    JUDITH VIORST
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  • ABSENCE
  • Absence sharpens love, presence strengthens it.
    THOMAS FULLER
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  • ABSENCE
  • Absences are a good influence in love and keep it bright and delicate.
    ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON
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  • ABSENCE
  • As some sad turtle his lost love deplores,
    Thus far from Delia to the winds I mourn,
    Alike unheard, unpitied, and forlorn.
    POPE
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  • ABSENCE
  • Fate some future bard shall join
    In sad similitude of griefs to mine;
    Condemn'd whole years in absence to deplore,
    And image charms he must behold no more.
    POPE
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  • ABSENCE
  • For since mine eye your joyous sight did miss,
    My cheerful day is turn'd to cheerless night.
    SPENSER
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  • ABSENCE
  • Forced from her presence, and condemn'd to live!
    Unwelcome freedom, and unthank'd reprieve.
    DRYDEN
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  • ABSENCE
  • Greater things are believed of those who are absent.
    TACITUS
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  • ABSENCE
  • His absence from his of he'll mourn,
    And, with his eyes, look wishes to return.
    DRYDEN
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  • ABSENCE
  • His friends beheld, and pity'd him in vain,
    For what advice can ease a lover's pain?
    Absence, the best expedient they could find,
    Might save the fortune, if not cure the mind.
    DRYDEN
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  • ABSENCE
  • How great love is, presence best trial makes,
    But absence tries how long this love will be.
    JOHN DONNE
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  • ABSENCE
  • I charge thee loiter not, but haste to bless me:
    Think with what eager hopes, what rage, I burn,
    For every tedious moment how I mourn:
    Think how I call thee cruel for thy stay,
    And break my heart with grief for thy delay.
    ROWE
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  • ABSENCE
  • In spring the fields, in autumn hills I love;
    At morn the plains, at noon the shady grove;
    But Delia always; absent from her sight,
    Nor plains at morn, nor groves at noon delight.
    POPE
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  • ABSENCE
  • In vain you tell your parting lover
    You wish fair winds may waft him over:
    Alas! what winds can happy prove,
    That bear me far from what I love?
    PRIOR
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  • ABSENCE
  • It takes time for the absent to assume their true shape in our thoughts. After death they take on a firmer outline and then cease to change.
    COLETTE
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  • ABSENCE
  • Looking my love, I go from place to place,
    Like a young fawn that late hath lost the hind;
    And seek each where, where last I saw her face,
    Whose image yet I carry fresh in mind.
    SPENSER
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  • ABSENCE
  • O thou that dost inhabit in my breast,
    Leave not the mansion so long tenantless;
    Lest, growing ruinous, the building fall,
    And leave no memory of what it was!
    Repair me with thy presence, Sylvia;
    Thou gentle nymph, cherish thy forlorn swain.
    SHAKESPEARE
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  • ABSENCE
  • Oh! couldst thou but know
    With what a deep devotedness of woe
    I wept thy absence, o'er and o'er again
    Thinking of thee, still thee, till thought grew pain,
    And memory, like a drop that night and day
    Falls cold and ceaseless, wore my heart away!
    MOORE
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  • ABSENCE
  • Our hours in love have wings; in absence crutches.
    COLLEY CIBBER
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  • ABSENCE
  • She vows for his return with vain devotion pays.
    DRYDEN
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  • ABSENCE
  • Short absence hurt him more,
    and made his wound far greater than before;
    Absence not long enough to root out quite
    All love, increases love at second sight.
    THOMAS MAY
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  • ABSENCE
  • Short retirement urges sweet return.
    MlLTON
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  • ABSENCE
  • Since I did leave the presence of my love,
    Many long weary days I have out-worn,
    And many nights that slowly seem'd to move
    Their sad protract from evening until morn.
    SPENSER
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  • ABSENCE
  • Since she must go, and I must mourn, come night,
    Environ me with darkness whilst I write.
    JOHN DONNE
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  • ABSENCE
  • Sometimes, when one person is missing, the whole world seems depopulated.
    LAMARTINE
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  • ABSENCE
  • The heart may think it knows better: the senses know that absence blots people out. We have really no absent friends.
    ELIZABETH BOWEN
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  • ABSENCE
  • Tho' I am forced thus to absent myself
    From all I love, I shall contrive some means,
    Some friendly intervals, to visit thee.
    SOUTHERN
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  • ABSENCE
  • Those who are absent are always wrong.
    ENGLISH PROVERB
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  • ABSENCE
  • We recognize the good only in its absence.
    Gentili, Mleket Mahshebet, 1710, Va-Yehi, 9.
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  • ABSENCE
  • What! keep a week away? seven days and nights?
    Eightscore eight hours? and lovers' absent hours,
    More tedious than the dial eightscore times?
    Oh, weary reckoning!
    SHAKESPEARE
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  • ABSENCE
  • When you part from your friend, you grieve not;
    For that which you love most in him may be clearer in his absence, as the mountain to the climber is clearer from the plain.
    KAHUL GIBRAN
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  • ABSENCE
  • Where'er I roam, whatever realms to see,
    My heart, untravell'd, fondly turns to thee:
    Still to my brother turns, with ceaseless pain,
    And drags at each remove a lengthening chain.
    GOLDSMITH
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  • ABSENCE
  • Winds murmur'd through the leaves your short delay
    And fountains o'er their pebbles chid your stay:
    But, with your presence cheer', they cease to mourn,
    And walks wear fresher green at your return.
    DRYDEN
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  • ABSENCE
  • Ye flowers that droop, forsaken by the spring;
    Ye birds that, left by summer, cease to sing,
    Ye trees that fade, when autumn heats remove,
    Say, is not absence death to those who love?
    POPE
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  • ABSETZEN
  • Abgesetzt wie ein coburger Sechser. - Literarisches Centralblatt, Leipzig 1863, S. 953.
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  • ABSETZEN
  • Abgesetzt wie ein dänischer Schilling. (In Pommern und Mecklenburg.)
    info] Bezieht sich auf eine frühere Reduction des dänischen Geldes.
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  • ABSETZEN
  • Dat sett hîde wat af, entweder e Rûsch oder e Brûsch. - Frischbier, I, 19.
    info] Pflegt man zu sagen, wenn man früh niesen muss.
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  • ABSICHT
  • Absicht ist die Seele der That.
    Frz.: C'est l'intention qui fait l'action. (Cahier, 883.) - L'intention est reputée le fait. (Cahier, 884.)
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  • ABSICHT
  • Eine gute Absicht macht eine böse That nicht gut.
    It.: La buona intenzione scusa il mal fatto. (Cahier, 2957.)
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  • ABSOLUTION
  • Ich bitte um Absolution für ein Stück Fleisch, was mir an den Zähnen hängen geblieben ist, sagte Peter, da hatte er einen Schinken an einem Schweinszahn aufgehangen.
    info] Junker Peter war Spassmacher am Hofe zu Neuburg.
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  • ABSOLUTION
  • Willst du Absolution, so musst du zur Beichte gohn.
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  • ABSOLVIEREN
  • Sich selber absolviren und mit Affenschmalz (s.d.) die Kehle schmieren. - Murner, Nb.
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  • ABSPANEN
  • Einem eine (einer einen) abspanen. (Nürtingen.)
    info] Nämlich eine(n) Geliebte(n) abgünstig, abwendig, abspänstig machen, vom althochdeutschen spanan, durch Verlockung eine Verbindung verlassen. (Weigand, Deutsches Wörterbuch, 3. Aufl.)
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  • ABSPEISEN
  • Einen abspeisen.
    info] Mit leeren Versprechungen oder Trostgründen.
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  • ABSPINNEN
  • Er will abspinnen.
    info] Sein Betragen ändern, bessern.
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  • ABSPLISS
  • Der Abspliss soll wieder in die Sale gelten. - Graf, 104, 231.
    info] Unsere Vorfahren waren gegen die grosse Zerstückelung der Güter, weil sie nach ihrer Ansicht zur Verarmung der Bauern führte. Nach Grimm, Weisthümer, II, 222 durfte eine Hufe in nicht mehr als zwei Theile getheilt werden, wobei sie auf mögliche Wiedervereinigung der Theile drangen und den Gespilden (s.d.) besondere Vorzüge im Näherrechte einräumten.
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  • ABSPRINGEN
  • Abspringen wie die Flöhe.
    info] Als beim Oberlandesgericht zu Glogau einst einige Auskultatoren die Verlegung des zweiten Examens nachsuchten, sagte der zur Prüfungscommission gehörende Geheime Rath Merckel: »Sie springen ja ab, wie die Flöhe.« (Schles. Provinzialblätter, 1863, S. 480.)
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  • ABSPUCKEN
  • Einen etwas abspucken. (Nürtingen.)
    info] Wird ausnahmsweise mit hochdeutscher Endung ausgesprochen; an andern Orten auch abspicken, d.h. ablernen.
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  • ABSTAMMEN
  • Der stammt, noch von Amolek ab. (Jüd.-deutsch.) - Tendlau, 36.
    info] Von einem Judenverfolger, weil Amalek den Israeliten zuerst feindlich entgegentrat (2 Mos. 17, 8).
    Lat.: Cecrope generosior.
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  • ABSTAMMEN
  • Er stammt von Johann von Leiden ab.
    info] Von einem, der mehr Unglück als Glück hat.
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  • ABSTAND
  • Der Abstand zwischen den Augen der Wölfe und den Gedanken der Diebe sind (untereinander) gleich. (Finn.)
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  • ABSTECHEN
  • 'T stekt of, as Dälers Laken. - Hauskalender, III; Bueren, 1158.
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  • ABSTECHER
  • Einen kleinen Abstecher machen.
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  • ABSTEIGEN
  • Ich stieg (obgleich bei seinem Hause) in einem wüsten Thale ab. (Arab.) - Burckhardt, 690.
    info] Von einem unwirthlichen Hause. Das Thal, welches hier gemeint wird, ist das von Mekka.
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  • ABSTERBEN
  • Man hat jhm weiss abgestrelet. (S. Ast 15.) - Lehmann, 780, 96.
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  • ABSTINENCE
  • Abstinence and fasting cure many a complaint.
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  • ABSTINENCE
  • Abstainers are physicians of faith and healers of souls.
    Bahya, Hobot HaLebabot, 1040, 9.2.
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  • ABSTINENCE
  • Abstinence is good in its place, i.e., if forbidden food, forbidden sexual indulgence, forbidden money present themselves.
    Saadia, Emunot VcDeot, 933, 10.4.
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  • ABSTINENCE
  • Abstinence is the beginning of saintliness.
    M. H. Luzzatto, Mesillat Yesharim, (1740), ch 13, p. 118.
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  • ABSTINENCE
  • Are there not enough injunctions in the Law that you must impose upon yourself additional prohibitions?
    Isaac. Talmud J: Nedarim, 9.1.
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  • ABSTINENCE
  • Deny yourself not the good which the day brings you, and let not your part in joy overpass you.
    Apocrypha: Ben Sira, 14.14.
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  • ABSTINENCE
  • He who denies himself a good life in this world is an ingrate, showing contempt for the King?s bounties and grace.
    Seder Eliyahu Rabbah, ch 15 (14), ed Friedmann, 69.
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  • ABSTINENCE
  • If you see anyone not taking food or drink when he should, refusing baths and oils, neglecting his clothes, sleeping on the ground, and fancying that he is thus practicing temperance, pity his selfdeception and show him the true path of temperance.
    Philo, The Worse Attacks the Better, 7.
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  • ABSTINENCE
  • Man will be called to account in the hereafter for each enjoyment he declined here without sufficient cause.
    Rab. Talmud ]: Kiddushin, 4.12.
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  • ABSTINENCE
  • Since he who denies himself wine is a sinner [Num. 6.11], how much more so is he who abstains from many things!
    Bar Kappara. Talmud Taanit, 11a.
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  • ABSTINENCE
  • The holy law imposes no asceticism. It demands that we ... grant each mental and physical faculty its due.
    Judah Halevi, Cuzan, c. 1135, 2.50.
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  • ABSTINENCE
  • When in doubt, do without.
    H. Samuel, A Book of Quotations, 1947, p. 191.
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  • ABSTINENCE
  • Who vows not to drink wine or cut his hair is a holy man.
    Eleazar b. Pedat. Talmud: Taanit, 11a.
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  • ABSTOßEN
  • Er stösst sich die Hörner ab.
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  • ABSTRAFEN
  • Abstrafen (am Leibe) und dabei schelten, ist zu viel.
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  • ABSTREICHELN
  • Was sich nicht abstreicheln lässt, das muss man abstriegeln. (S. Abbürsten.)
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  • ABSURD
  • God made everything out of the void, but the void shows through.
    PAUL VALÉRY
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  • ABSURD
  • If life must not he taken too seriously - then so neither must death.
    SAMUEL BUTLER
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  • ABSURD
  • In a world where everything is ridiculous, nothing can be ridiculed. You cannot unmask a mask.
    G. K. CHESTERTON
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  • ABSURD
  • Life has to be given a meaning because of the obvious fact that it has no meaning.
    HENRY MILLER
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  • ABSURD
  • Life is a jest, and all things show it;
    I thought so once, but now I know it.
    JOHN GAY
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  • ABSURD
  • Man's "progress" is but a gradual discovery that his questions have no meaning.
    SAINT-EXUPÉRY
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  • ABSURD
  • The absurd is essentially a divorce. It lies in neither of the elements compared; it is born of their confrontation.
    ALBERT CAMUS
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  • ABSURD
  • The more absurd life is, the more insupportable death is.
    JEAN-PAUL SARTRE
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  • ABSURD
  • Unextinguished laughter shakes the skies.
    HOMER
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  • ABSURDITY
  • At any streetcorner the feeling of absurdity can strike any man in the face. As it is, in its distressing nudity, in its light without effulgence, it is elusive.
    ALBERT CAMUS, THE MYTH OF SISYPHUS (1955)
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