DICTUM

keywords Ac

  • ACKERWERK
  • Ackerwerk soll nähren.
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  • ACKERWERK
  • Wer sein Ackerwerk nicht verlässt, den wird es auch nicht verlassen. - Boebel, 141.
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  • ACQUAINTANCES
  • Acquaintance, n. A person whom we know well enough to borrow from, But not well enough to lend to.
    AMBROSE BIERCE, THE DEVIL'S DICTIONARY (1881-1911)
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  • ACQUAINTANCES
  • Chance acquaintances are sometimes the most memorable, for brief friendships have such definite starting and stopping points that they take on a quality of art, of a whole thing, which cannot be broken or spoiled.
    WILLIAM SAROYAN, CHANCE MEETINGS (1978)
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  • ACQUAINTANCES
  • How casually and unobservedly we make all our most valued acquaintances.
    EMERSON, JOURNALS, 1833
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  • ACQUAINTANCES
  • If a man does not make new acquaintance as he advances through life, he will soon find himself left alone.
    SAMUEL JOHNSON, QUOTED IN BOSWELL'S LIFE OF SAMUEL JOHNSON, APRIL 1775
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  • ACQUAINTANCES
  • There is a scarcity of friendship, but not of friends.
    THOMAS FULLER, M.D., GNOMOLOGIA H732), 4880
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  • ACQUAINTANCES
  • What causes us to like new acquaintances is not so much weariness of our old ones, or the pleasure of change, as disgust at not being sufficiently admired by those who know us too well, and the hope of being admired more by those who do not know so much about us.
    LA ROCHEFOUCAULD, MAXIMS (1665)
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  • ACQUISITION
  • Accursed greed for gold,
    To what dost thou not drive the heart of man?
    VERGIL, AENEID (30-19 B.C.), 3.56
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  • ACQUISITION
  • An end to our getting is the only end to our losses.
    PUBLILIUS SYRUS, MORAL SAYINGS (1ST C. B.C.), 661
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  • ACQUISITION
  • Hand, n. A singular instrument worn at the end of a human arm and commonly thrust into somebody's pocket.
    AMBROSE BIERCE, THE DEVIL'S DICTIONARY (1881-1911)
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  • ACQUISITION
  • How could there be any question of acquiring or possessing, when the one thing needful for a man is to become - to be at last, and to die in the fullness of his being.
    SAINT-EXUPÉRY, THE WISDOM OF THE SANDS (1948), 38
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  • ACQUISITION
  • I glory
    More in the cunning purchase of my wealth
    Than in the glad possession.
    BEN JONSON, VOLPONE (1605), I.1
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  • ACQUISITION
  • In the race for money some men may come first, but man comes last.
    MARYA MANNES, IN LIFE, JUNE 12, 1964
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  • ACQUISITION
  • It is among the less privileged groups relatively new to leisure and consumption that the zest for possessions retains something of its pristine energy.
    DAVID RIESMAN, ABUNDANCE FOR WHAT? (1964)
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  • ACQUISITION
  • It is easy to get everything you want, provided you first learn to do without the things you can not get.
    ELBERT HUBBARD, THE NOTE BOOK (1927)
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  • ACQUISITION
  • Seek not proud riches, but such as thou mayest get justly, use soberly, distribute cheerfully, and leave contentedly.
    FRANCIS BACON, "OF RICHES," ESSAYS (1625)
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  • ACQUISITION
  • The collector walks with blinders on; he sees nothing but the prize. In fact, the acquisitive instinct is incompatible with true appreciation of beauty.
    ANNE MORROW LINDBERGH, "A FEW SHELLS," GIFT FROM THE SEA (1955)
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  • ACQUISITION
  • With the catching end the pleasures of the chase.
    ABRAHAM LINCOLN, SPEECH, JAN. 27, 1838
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  • ACTING
  • Acting is all about honesty. If you can fake that, you've got it made.
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  • ACTING
  • Acting is merely the art of keeping a large group of people from coughing.
    Sir Ralph Richardson
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  • ACTING
  • Acting is not being emotional, but being able to express emotion.
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  • ACTING
  • Acting like someone you're not is exactly what it takes to realize you're capable of more than you ever knew.
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  • ACTING
  • Being a celebrity has taught me to hide, but being an actor has opened my soul.
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  • ACTING
  • Empathy is at the heart of the actor's art.
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  • ACTING
  • I love acting. It is so much more real than life.
    info] Oscar Wilde (1854 - 1900), The Picture of Dorian Gray, 1891
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  • ACTING
  • Talk low, talk slow, and don't talk too much.
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  • ACTING
  • The most difficult character in comedy is that of a fool, and he must be no simpleton who plays the part.
    info] Miguel de Cervantes (1547 - 1616), Don Quixote, 1605
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  • ACTING
  • We're actors - we're the opposite of people.
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  • ACTION
  • A life of action and danger moderates the dread of death. It not only gives us fortitude to bear pain, but teaches us at every step the precarious tenure on which we hold our present being.
    WILLIAM HAZLITT, "ON THE FEAR OF DEATH," TABLE TALK (1821-22)
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  • ACTION
  • A man's most open actions have a secret side to them.
    JOSEPH CONRAD, UNDER WESTERN EYES (1911), 1.2
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  • ACTION
  • A thought which does not result in an action is nothing much, and an action which does not proceed from a thought is nothing at all.
    GEORGES BERNANOS, "FRANCE BEFORE THE WORLD OF TOMORROW," THE LAST ESSAYS OF GEORGES BERNANOS (1955)
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  • ACTION
  • Act only on that maxim whereby you can at the same time will that it should become a universal law.
    IMMANUEL KANT, CRITIQUE OF PRACTICAL REASON (1788)
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  • ACTION
  • Act while you can: while you have the chance, the means, and the strength.
    Simeon b. Eleazar. Talmud: Sabbath, 151b.
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  • ACTION
  • Action is the great business of mankind, and the whole matter about which all laws are conversant.
    John Locke, An Essay concerning Human Understanding (1690), 2.22.10
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  • ACTION
  • Action is the proof, the criterion, of the Holy Spirit.
    H. Cohen, Religion der Vemunft, 1919, ch 7. q FJA, 277.
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  • ACTION
  • Action is the proper fruit of knowledge.
    THOMAS FULLER, M.D., GNOMOLOGIA (1732), 760
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  • ACTION
  • Action is what matters. ... We are present where we act.
    Bergson, Two Sources of Morality & Religion, 1935, p. 247.
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  • ACTION
  • Action should culminate in wisdom.
    BHAGAVADGITA, 4
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  • ACTION
  • Action takes precedence over study.
    Judah HaNasi. Talmud: Pesahim, 3.7.
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  • ACTION
  • Action will remove the doubt that theory cannot solve.
    TEHYI HSIEH, CHINESE EPIGRAMS INSIDE OUT AND PROVERBS (1948)
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  • ACTION
  • Begin and proceed on a settled and not-to-beshaken conviction that but little is permitted to any man to do or to know, and if he complies with the first grand laws, he shall do well.
    EMERSON, JOURNALS, 1832
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  • ACTION
  • Can it be that action is active resignation? Something is trying to develop; it moves ever so slightly, and there comes your man of action and bashes in the hothouse windows.
    GÜNTER GRASS, LOCAL ANAESTHETIC (1970)
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  • ACTION
  • Everyone can raise himself, but only by his own actions.
    Nahman Bratzlav. q HLH, 80f.
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  • ACTION
  • From the moment of birth we are immersed in action, and can only fitfully guide it by taking thought.
    ALFRED NORTH WHITEHEAD, SCIENCE AND THE MODERN WORLD (1925), 12
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  • ACTION
  • He that has done nothing has known nothing.
    THOMAS CARLYLE, "CORN-LAW RHYMES" (1832)
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  • ACTION
  • I myself must mix with action, lest I wither by despair.
    LORD TENNYSON, "LOCKSLEY HALL" (1842)
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  • ACTION
  • In action, be primitive; in foresight, a strategist.
    RENÉ CHAR, LEAVES OF HYPNOS, 72, IN HYPNOS WAKING (1956)
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  • ACTION
  • In our era, the road to holiness necessarily passes through the world of action.
    DAG HAMMARSKJÖLD, "1955," MARKINGS (1964)
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  • ACTION
  • In the arena of human life the honours and rewards fall to those who show their good qualities in action.
    ARISTOTLE, NICOMACHEAN ETHICS (4TH C. B.C. ), I.8
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  • ACTION
  • It's all right to hesitate if you then go ahead.
    BERTOLT BRECHT, PROLOGUE. THE GOOD WOMAN OF SETZUAN (1938-40)
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  • ACTION
  • Life is made up of constant calls to action, and we seldom have time for more than hastily contrived answers.
    LEARNED HAND, SPEECH, NEW YORK CITY, JAN. 27, 1952
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  • ACTION
  • Lust and force are the source of all our actions; lust causes voluntary actions, force involuntary ones.
    PASCAL, PENSÉES (1670), 334
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  • ACTION
  • Men must beware of looking upon religion as an ideal to be yearned for, it should be an ideal to be applied.
    Dubnow Jewish History, 1903, p. 54f.
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  • ACTION
  • Men of action, whose minds are too busy with the day's work to see beyond it. They are essential men, we cannot do without them, and yet we must not allow all our vision to be bound by the limitations of "men of action."
    PEARL S. BUCK, WHAT AMERICA MEANS TO ME (1943), 4
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  • ACTION
  • Most men are in a coma when they are at rest and mad when they act.
    EPICURUS, "VATICAN SAYINGS" (3RD C. B.C.)
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  • ACTION
  • No matter how much faculty of idle seeing a man has, the step from knowing to doing is rarely taken.
    EMERSON, "POWER," THE CONDUCT OF LIFE (1860)
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  • ACTION
  • Once turn to practice, error and truth will no longer consort together.
    THOMAS CARLYLE, "CORN-LAW RHYMES" (1832)
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  • ACTION
  • One starts an action
    Simply because one must do something.
    T. S. ELIOT, THE ELDER STATESMAN (1958), 2
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  • ACTION
  • Only the action that is moved by love for the good at hand has the hope of being responsible and generous.
    WENDELL BERRY, "STANDING BY WORDS," STANDING BY WORDS (1983)
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  • ACTION
  • People who know how to act are never preachers.
    EMERSON, JOURNALS, 1844
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  • ACTION
  • Religion muit justify itself through the moral action.
    Elbogen, BKF, 1929, p. 52.
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  • ACTION
  • The great end of life is not knowledge but action.
    THOMAS HENRY HUXLEY, "TECHNICAL EDUCATION" (1877)
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  • ACTION
  • The materials of action are variable, but the use we make of them should be constant.
    EPICTETUS, DISCOURSES (2ND C.), 2.5
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  • ACTION
  • The memory of great actions never dies.
    Disraeli, Alroy, 1833, 10.19.
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  • ACTION
  • The pestilential marsh is made of stagnant waters; but quickening is life, and quickening is action.
    Harrison, Religion of a Modem Liberal, 1931, p. 70.
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  • ACTION
  • The test of any man lies in action.
    PINDAR, ODES (5TH C. B.G.), OLYMPIA 4
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  • ACTION
  • There can be no acting or doing of any kind, till it be recognized that there is a thing to be done; the thing once recognized, doing in a thousand shapes becomes possible.
    THOMAS CARLYLE, CHARTISM (1839), 6
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  • ACTION
  • Think'st thou existence doth depend on time?
    It doth; but actions are our epochs.
    BYRON, MANFRED (1817), 2.1
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  • ACTION
  • Through faith man experiences the meaning of the world; through action he is to give to it a meaning.
    Baeck, Essence of Judaism, (1922) 1936, p. 122.
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  • ACTION
  • To dispose a soul to action we must upset its equilibrium.
    ERIC HOFFER, THE ORDEAL OF CHANGE (1964), 5
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  • ACTION
  • To refrain from sinful action is itself a religious act.
    Huna. Cant. R., 4.4.3.
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  • ACTION
  • Unreal is action without discipline, charity without sympathy, ritual without devotion.
    BHAGAVADGITA, 1
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  • ACTION
  • We cannot withdraw our cards from the game. Were we as silent and as mute as stones, our Very passivity would be an act.
    JEAN-PAUL SARTRE, "PRÉSENTATION DES TEMPS MODERNES," SITUATIONS (1947-49), V. 2
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  • ACTION
  • Wisdom without action is like a tree without fruit.
    J. Kimhi, Shekel HaKodesh, 12C.
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  • ACTIONS
  • Action is character.
    info] F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896 - 1940), The Last Tycoon, 1941
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  • ACTIONS
  • Actions lie louder than words.
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  • ACTIONS
  • Aggressive fighting for the right is the greatest sport in the world.
    info] Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919)
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  • ACTIONS
  • All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsion, habit, reason, passion, and desire.
    info] Aristotle (384 BC - 322 BC)
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  • ACTIONS
  • An event had happened, upon which it is difficult to speak, and impossible to be silent.
    info] Edmund Burke (1729 - 1797), Speeches... in the Trial of Warren Hastings, May 5, 1789
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  • ACTIONS
  • Delay is preferable to error.
    info] Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826), Letter to George Washington, May 16, 1792
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  • ACTIONS
  • Deliberation is the function of the many; action is the function of one.
    info] Charles de Gaulle (1890 - 1970), War Memoirs, 1960
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  • ACTIONS
  • Don't be too timid and squeamish about your actions. All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better.
    info] Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)
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  • ACTIONS
  • Happiness lies not in the mere possession of money. It lies in the joy of achievement, in the thrill of creative effort.
    info] Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882 - 1945), Speeches... in the Trial of Warren Hastings, May 5, 1789
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  • ACTIONS
  • I have always thought the actions of men the best interpreters of their thoughts.
    info] John Locke (1632 - 1704)
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  • ACTIONS
  • I was seldom able to see an opportunity until it had ceased to be one.
    info] Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)
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  • ACTIONS
  • In this theater of man's life, it is reserved only for God and for angels to be lookers-on.
    info] Sir Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)
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  • ACTIONS
  • Life is one long process of getting tired.
    info] Samuel Butler (1835 - 1902), Notebooks, 1912
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  • ACTIONS
  • Men acquire a particular quality by constantly acting a particular way... you become just by performing just actions, temperate by performing temperate actions, brave by performing brave actions.
    info] Aristotle (384 BC - 322 BC)
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  • ACTIONS
  • Nothing will ever be attempted if all possible objections must be first overcome.
    info] Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784), Rasselas, 1759
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  • ACTIONS
  • Only actions give life strength; only moderation gives it a charm.
    info] Jean Paul Richter (1763 - 1825)
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  • ACTIONS
  • The superior man is modest in his speech, but exceeds in his actions.
    info] Confucius (551 BC - 479 BC), The Confucian Analects
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  • ACTIONS
  • We are face to face with our destiny and we must meet it with high and resolute courage. For us is the life of action, of strenuous performance of duty; let us live in the harness, striving mightily; let us rather run the risk of wearing out than rusting out.
    info] Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919), Address at the opening of the gubernatorial campaign, New York City, October 5, 1898
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  • ACTIONS
  • We defend and we build a way of life, not for America alone, but for all mankind.
    info] Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882 - 1945), Fireside chat on national defense, May 26, 1940
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  • ACTIONS
  • We have too many high sounding words, and too few actions that correspond with them.
    info] Abigail Adams (1744 - 1818), letter to John Adams, 1774
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  • ACTIONS
  • When a man asks himself what is meant by action he proves he is not a man of action. Action is a lack of balance. In order to act you must be somewhat insane. A reasonably sensible man is satisfied with thinking.
    info] Georges Clemenceau (1841 - 1929), Conversation with Jean Martet, January 1 1929
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  • ACTIONS
  • Words without actions are the assassins of idealism.
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  • ACTIONS
  • You ask me why I do not write something....I think one's feelings waste themselves in words, they ought all to be distilled into actions and into actions which bring results.
    info] Florence Nightingale (1820 - 1910), in Cecil Woodham-Smith, Florence Nightingale, 1951
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  • ACTIONS
  • You cannot have a proud and chivalrous spirit if your conduct is mean and paltry; for whatever a man's actions are, such must be his spirit.
    info] Demosthenes (384 BC - 322 BC), Third Olynthiac
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  • ACTIVITY
  • Better to be eaten to death with a rust than to be scoured to nothing with perpetual motion.
    SHAKESPEARE, 2 HENRY IV (1597-98), I.2.245
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