DICTUM

keywords An

  • ANGELS
  • Virgins visited by angel pow'rs.
    POPE
  • 3
  • ANGELS
  • When we behold an angel, not to fear,
    Is to be impudent.
    DRYDEN
  • 3
  • ANGELS
  • Why, whilst we struggle in this vale beneath,
    With want and sorrow, with disease and death,
    Do they, more bless'd, perpetual life employ
    In songs of pleasure and in scenes of joy?
    PRIOR
  • 3
  • ANGELS
  • Ye careful angels whom eternal fate
    Ordains on earth and human acts to wait,
    Who turn with secret pow'r this restless ball,
    And bid predestined empires rise and fall.
    PRIOR
  • 3
  • ANGEMACHTES
  • Sint er pregelt Angemachts hat, hat sich ihm asons nischt getroffen. (Jüd.-deutsch. Brody.)
    info] Sint = seit; pregelt = zubereitet; Angemachts = eingemachte Confituren; asons = so etwas. Wird angewandt, wenn jemand im Gewinn Grosses unerwartet erreicht.
  • 1
  • ANGENEHM
  • Besser angenehm sein, als den Angenehmen spielen.
    Span.:] Mas vale caer en gracia, que ser gracioso. (Cahier, 3445.)
  • 1
  • ANGENEHM
  • Es ist doppelt angenehm, was in Nöthen geschiht. - Lehmann, II, 140, 127.
  • 1
  • ANGENEHM
  • Mir ist das grade sehr angenehm, sagte der Hofnarr, und ging auf die linke Seite, als ein Hofmann zu ihm sagte, er könne es nicht leiden, dass ihm ein Narr zur rechten Hand gehe.
  • 1
  • ANGENEHM
  • Was angenehm dem Kragen (Gaumen), dient nicht stets dem Magen.
  • 1
  • ANGENEHM
  • Was angenehm dem Mund, ist nicht immer gesund.
    Lat.:] Ciborum varietas una est morborum causa.
  • 1
  • ANGENEHM
  • Was dem einen angenehm, ist dem andern unbequem.
    info] Die Alten sagten dagegen: Si tibi amicum, nec mihi inimicum. (Erasm., 80.)
  • 1
  • ANGENEHM
  • Was dir angenehm, ist mir nicht unangenehm.
    info] Ausdruck der Höflichkeit, womit man sich dem Willen oder der Ansicht eines andern anschliesst.
    Lat.:] Si tibi amicum, nec mihi inimicum. (Faselius, 237.)
  • 1
  • ANGENEHM
  • Wer Angenehmes haben will, muss Liebes schenken.
    Lat.:] Donet amorosa, qui vult desiderosa. (Reuterdahl, 221.)
    Schwed.:] Hwilkin koerth wil hawa han, skal liwffth late. (Reuterdahl, 221.)
  • 1
  • ANGENEHM
  • Wo das Angenehme, da sind die Augen, wo das Unbequeme (Weh), da sind die Hände.
  • 1
  • ANGENEHM
  • Er ist so angenehm wie der Topf Elisa's.
  • 2
  • ANGENEHM
  • Er ist so angenehm wie die thörichten Jungfrauen mit den leeren Lampen.
  • 2
  • ANGENEHM
  • Er ist so angenehm wie ein Hund beim Kegelspiel.
    Holl.:] Hij is er zoo aangenaam als een hond in een Kegelspel. (Harrebomée, I, 319b.)
  • 2
  • ANGENEHM
  • Es ist angenehm, die Füsse unter eines andern Tisch zu strecken.
  • 2
  • ANGENEHM
  • Es ist so angenehm als ein freies Bett. (Altröm.)
    info] Unter freiem Bett ist hier eheloses Leben zu verstehen.
  • 2
  • ANGENEHM
  • Es ist so angenehm wie Abtrittputzen.
  • 2
  • ANGENEHM
  • Es ist so angenehm wie das Kämmen der Stiefmutter.
    Böhm.:] Príjem no, co macesino cesání. (Celakovský, 401.)
  • 2
  • ANGENEHM
  • Es ist so angenehm wie ein Kaufmann dem Krämer.
  • 2
  • ANGENEHM
  • Es ist so angenehm wie eine Bratwurst dem Hunde.
  • 2
  • ANGENEHM
  • Es ist so angenehm wie Essig den Zähnen und Rauch den Augen.
  • 2
  • ANGENEHM
  • Es ist so angenehm wie Wildpret in eines armen Mannes Haus.
  • 2
  • ANGENEHM
  • So angenehm als der Hund in der Küche. - Wirth, I, 9.
  • 2
  • ANGENEHM
  • So angenehm als der Rauch im Auge.
  • 2
  • ANGENEHM
  • So angenehm als die Sau im Judenhaus.
  • 2
  • ANGENEHM
  • So angenehm als ein Floh im Ohr.
  • 2
  • ANGENEHM
  • So angenehm als ein Stein im Schuh.
  • 2
  • ANGENEHM
  • So angenehm wie ein Aufpasser zwischen zweien Liebenden. - Günsburg, 116, 34.
  • 2
  • ANGENEHMERES
  • Nichts angenehmeres ist doch auf der Erd, als eine schöne Dam' und ein schön Pferd.
    info] Angeblich der Wahlspruch eines Fuggers des 16. Jahrhunderts. Ein Spruch, von dem Riehl sagt, dass er an gar manchem alten augsburger Hause in heitern sinnlich-kecken Gruppen al fresco illustrirt sei.
  • 1
  • ANGER
  • Ein Anger, der zu viel betreten wird, grünt nicht.
    info] Auch in Bezug auf die Unfruchtbarkeit öffentlicher Dirnen und ausschweifender Frauen.
  • 1
  • ANGER
  • A background of wrath, which can be stirred up to the murderous infernal pitch, does lie in every man.
    THOMAS CARLYLE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • A countenance more in sorrow than in anger.
    SHAKESPEARE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • A man that does not know how to be angry does not know how to be good.
    HENRY WARD BEECHER
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • A sharp-tempered woman, or, for that matter, a man,
    Is easier to deal with than the clever type
    Who holds her tongue.
    EURIPIDES
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Always shun whatever may make you angry.
    PUBLILIUS SYRUS
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Anger as soon as fed is dead -
    'Tis starving makes it fat - .
    EMILY DICKINSON
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Anger is like
    A full hot horse, who being allow'd his way,
    Self-mettle tires him.
    SHAKESPEARE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Anger is one of the sinews of the soul; he that wants [lacks] it hath a maimed mind.
    THOMAS FULLER
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Anger may be foolish and absurd, and one may be irritated when in the wrong; but a man never feels outraged unless in some respect he is at bottom right.
    VICTOR HUGO
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Anger represents a certain power, when a great mind, prevented from executing its own generous desires, is moved by it.
    PIETRO ARETINO
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Anger would inflict punishment on another; meanwhile, it tortures itself.
    PUBLILIUS SYRUS
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Being once chafed, he cannot
    Be rein'd again to temperance; then he speaks
    What's in his heart.
    SHAKESPEARE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Full many mischiefs follow cruel wrath,
    Abhorred bloodshed, and tumultuous strife,
    Unmanly murder, and unthrifty scath.
    SPENSER: Faerie Queene
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Harsh words, that once elanced, must ever fly Irrevocable.
    PRIOR
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Have you not love enough to bear with me,
    When that rash humour which my mother gave me
    Makes me forgetful?
    SHAKESPEARE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • He that is slow to anger is better than the mighty; and he that ruleth his spirit than he that taketh a city.
    BIBLE, PROVERBS 16:32
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • He who doesn't know anger doesn't know anything. He doesn't know the immediate.
    HENRI MICHAUX
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • How often, being moved under a false cause, if the person offending makes a good defense and presents us with a just excuse, are we angry against truth and innocence itself?
    MONTAIGNE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • I beg the grace
    You would lay by those terrors of your face;
    Till calmness to your eyes you first restore,
    I am afraid, and I can beg no more.
    DRYDEN
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • I know of no more disagreeable situation than to be left feeling generally angry without anybody in particular to be angry at.
    FRANK MOORE COLBY
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • If on your head my fury does not turn,
    Thank that fond dotage which so much you scorn.
    DRYDEN
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • In the souls of the people the grapes of wrath are filling and growing heavy, growing heavy for the vintage.
    JOHN STEINBECK
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • In thy face
    I see thy fury; if I longer stay,
    We shall begin our ancient bickerings.
    SHAKESPEARE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • In times of great stress or adversity, it's always best to keep busy, to plow your anger and your energy into something positive.
    LEE IACOCCA
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • It engenders choler; planteth anger;
    And better 'twere that both of us did fast,
    Since, of ourselves, ourselves are choleric,
    Than feed it with such over-roasted flesh.
    SHAKESPEARE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • It is easy to fly into a passion - anybody can do that - but to be angry with the right person to the right extent and at the right time and with the right object and in the right way - that is not easy, and it is not everyone who can do it.
    ARISTOTLE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Let not the sun go down upon your wrath.
    BIBLE, EPHESIANS 4:26
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Life is thorny; and youth is vain;
    And to be wroth with one we love
    Doth work like madness in the brain.
    SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Many people lose their tempers merely from seeing you keep yours.
    FRANK MOORE COLBY
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • No man is angry that feels not himself hurt.
    FRANCIS BACON
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Nothing on earth consumes a man more quickly than the passion of resentment.
    NIETZSCHE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Of all bad things by which mankind are cursed,
    Their own bad tempers surely are the worst.
    RICHARD CUMBERLAND: Menander
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Put him to choler straight: he hath been used
    Ever to conquer, and to have his word
    Of contradiction.
    SHAKESPEARE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Scarce can I speak, my choler is so great:
    Oh! I could hew up rocks, and fight with flint.
    SHAKESPEARE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • The bare recollection of anger kindles anger.
    PUBLILIUS SYRUS
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • The brain may devise laws for the blood, but a hot temper leaps o'er a cold decree.
    SHAKESPEARE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.
    WILLIAM BLAKE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • There is no old age for a man's anger,
    Only death.
    SOPHOCLES
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Thou with scorn
    And anger would resent the offer' d wrong.
    MILTON
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Unknit that threat'ning unkind brow;
    It blots thy beauty, as frost bites the meads,
    Confounds thy fame.
    SHAKESPEARE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Usually when people are sad, they don't do anything. They just cry over their condition. But when they get angry, they bring about a change.
    MALCOLM X
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • What sullen fury clouds his scornful brow?
    POPE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • Whatsoever
    Is worthy of their love is worth their anger.
    SIR J. DENHAM
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • When anger rushes, unrestrain'd, to action,
    Like a hot steed, it stumbles in its way:
    The man of thought strikes deepest, and strikes safest.
    SAVAGE: Sir Thomas Overbury
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • When angry, count four; when very angry, swear.
    MARK TWAIN
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • When do you really get enraged? When you have a neighbor who never lets you feel at home.
    THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • When he knew his rival freed and gone,
    He swells with wrath; he makes outrageous moan:
    He frets, he fumes, he stares, he stamps the ground,
    The hollow tow'r with clamours rings around.
    DRYDEN
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • With such sober and unnoted passion
    He did behave his anger ere 'twas spent,
    As if he had proved an argument.
    SHAKESPEARE
  • 3
  • ANGER
  • You, too weak the slightest loss to bear,
    Are on the fret of passion, boil and rage.
    CREECH
  • 3
  • ANGERANNT
  • Bald angerannt, ist halb gewonnen.
  • 1
  • ANGERANNT
  • Wohl angerannt, ist halb gefochten.
  • 1
  • ANGERUFEN
  • Es ist besser angeruffen, als angegriffen werden. (S. Feind 124.) - Lehmann, 436, 45.
  • 1
  • ANGESÄUSELT
  • Er ist angesäuselt. (Deutz.)
    info] Kleiner Rausch.
  • 2
  • ANGESCHOSSEN
  • Er ist angeschossen. - Körte2, Redensarten der Zechbrüder, 33.
    info] Von einem Betrunkenen.
    info] Westf.: Hei is anschoeten.
  • 2
  • ANGESCHRIEBEN
  • Er ist da gut (schlecht) angeschrieben.
  • 2
  • ANGESEHEN
  • Angesehen wie ein Spiess in den Augen.
  • 2
  • ANGESEHEN
  • Es ist angesehen, allzeit drei Keller zu einem Koch. - Fischart, Gesch.
  • 2
  • ANGESICHT
  • Am Angesichte sieht man's wol.
    Frz.:] Au vis se découvre souvent le vice.
  • 1
  • ANGESICHT
  • Angesicht die That ausspricht. - Steiger, 38.
    Lat.:] Efficiunt tetrum teterrima crimina vultum.
  • 1
  • ANGESICHT
  • Angesicht falsch bericht't.
  • 1
  • ANGESICHT
  • Angesicht, falscher Wicht.
  • 1
  • ANGESICHT
  • Bei dem Angesicht kent man den Mann. - Petri, II, 41.
  • 1
  • ANGESICHT
  • Beim Angesicht kennt man den Mohren, bei den Worten den Thoren.
    Dän.:] Af Ansigtet kiendes manden.
    Holl.:] Aan het aangezigt kent men de lieden. (Harrebomée, I, 2.)
    Lat.:] Frons animi interpres.
  • 1
  • ANGESICHT
  • Blöd Angesicht macht keine scharfen Witze.
  • 1
  • ANGESICHT
  • Blot angesicht, blote Witz. - Lehmann, 410, 27.
  • 1
  • ANGESICHT
  • Das angesicht ausswendig zeigt, was ein man im hertzen treit. - Loci comm., 207.
    Lat.:] Est facies testis, quales intrinsecus estis. (Loci comm., 207.)
  • 1
  • ANGESICHT
  • Das angesicht entdecket den list, wie eim vmbs hertz ist. - Franck, II, 21b.
  • 1
  • <<< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 >>>

    alphabetical
    A-a A-b A-c A-d A-e A-f A-g A-h A-i
    A-j A-k A-l A-m A-n A-o A-p A-q
    A-r A-s A-t A-u A-v A-w A-y A-z
    Aa Ab Ac Ad Ae Af Ag Ah Ai Aj Ak Al Am
    An Ao Ap Aq Ar As At Au Av Aw Ax Ay Az
    Ba Be

    keywords
    Aa Ab Ac Ad Ae Af Ag Ah Ai Ak Al Am An Aq Ap Ar As At Au Av Aw Ax Az
    Ba Be

    DICTUM operone