DICTUM

keywords Ar

  • ART
  • Es ist eine rare Art, sie hat immerfort Eier und Junge.
    info] Sprichwort der Taubenhändler und Liebhaber; auch von fruchtbaren Eheleuten.
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  • ART
  • Es muss Alles eine Art haben.
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  • ART
  • Et helt kên Art und Schick. - Schütze, I, 49.
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  • ART
  • He drift ken Art darto. (Köln.) - Schütze, I, 49.
    info] Er wendet keinen Fleiss an.
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  • ART
  • Ist das eine Art und Weise?
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  • ART
  • Ke n' Ard ond ke Gattig ha. - Tobler, 26.
    info] Alle Form verloren haben. Gattig (Gattung): 1) Das Aussehen einer Sache oder Person, von letzterer auch die Manier, das Geberdenspiel. 2) Auch Vernehmen, Sage; ab der Gattig = dem Vernehmen nach. (Tobler, 215.)
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  • ART
  • So, dass es eine Art hat.
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  • ART
  • Art from that fund each just supply provides,
    Works without show, and without pomp presides.
    POPE.
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  • ART
  • Famous Greece,
    That source of art and cultivated thought,
    Which they to Rome, and Romans hither brought.
    WALLER.
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  • ART
  • From vulgar bounds with brave disorder part,
    And snatch a grace beyond the reach of art.
    POPE : Essay on Criticism.
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  • ART
  • Good Howard, emulous of the Grecian art.
    PRIOR.
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  • ART
  • In framing artists, art hath thus decreed :
    To make some good, but others to exceed.
    SHAKESPEARE.
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  • ART
  • Semblant art shall carve the fair effect
    And full achievement of thy great designs.
    PRIOR.
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  • ART
  • Such tools as art yet rude had form'd.
    MILTON.
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  • ART
  • The whole world, without art and dress,
    Would be but one great wilderness,
    And mankind but a savage herd,
    For all that nature has conferr'd :
    This does but roughen and design,
    Leaves art to polish and refine.
    BUTLER: Hudibras.
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  • ART
  • Their wildness lose, and, quitting nature's part,
    Obey the rules and discipline of art.
    DRYDEN.
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  • ART
  • To wake the soul by tender strokes of art,
    To raise the genius, and to mend the heart.
    POPE: Prologs to "Cato."
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  • ART
  • We oft our slowly growing works impart,
    While images reflect from art to art.
    POPE.
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • After all, perhaps the greatness of art lies in the perpetual tension between beauty and pain, the love of men and the madness of creation, unbearable solitude and the exhausting crowd, rejection and consent.
    ALBERT CAMUS
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • All art is a kind of confession, more or less oblique. All artists, if they are to survive, are forced, at last, to tell the whole story, to vomit the anguish up.
    JAMES BALDWIN
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • An artist cannot speak about his art any more than a plant can discuss horticulture.
    JEAN COCTEAU
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • An artist carries on throughout his life a mysterious, uninterrupted conversation with his public.
    MAURICE CHEVALIER
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • An artist conscientiously moves in a direction which for some good reason he takes, putting one work in front of the other with the hope he'll arrive before death overtakes him.
    JOHN CAGE
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • An artist is a man of action, whether he creates a personality, invents an expedient, or finds the issue of a complicated situation.
    JOSEPH CONRAD
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Art and science create a balance to material life and enlarge the world of living experience. Art leads to a more profound concept of life, because art itself is a profound expression of feeling.
    HANS HOFMANN
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Art distills sensation and embodies it with enhanced meaning in memorable form - or else it is not art.
    JACQUES BARZUN
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Art helps nature, and experience art.
    THOMAS FULLER
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Art is a jealous mistress.
    EMERSON
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Art is in love with luck, and luck with art.
    AGATHON
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Art is meant to disturb. Science reassures.
    GEORGES BRAQUE
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • As a matter of history great developments in art have often been remarkably separate from religious motivation and use.
    RUTH BENEDICT
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Bullfighting is the only art in which the artist is in danger of death and in which the degree of brilliance in the performance is left to the fighter's honor.
    ERNEST HEMINGWAY
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • But it's hard to talk about art. Maybe there should be a law against it, some First Amendment gag order like crying fire in a crowded theater.
    STANLEY ELKIN
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • By artist I mean of course everyone who has tried to create something which was not here before him, with no other tools and material than the uncommerciable ones of the human spirit.
    WILLIAM FAULKNER
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Every artist writes his own autobiography.
    HAVELOCK ELLIS
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Every major work of art is a transgression, but the artist is not necessarily, by nature, a transgressor.
    E. L. DOCTOROW
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Every man's work, whether it be literature or music or pictures or architecture or anything else, is always a portrait of himself, and the more he tries to conceal himself the more clearly will his character appear in spite of him.
    SAMUEL BUTLER
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Every master knows that the material teaches the artist.
    ILYA EHRENBURG
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • For us artists there waits the joyous compromise through art with all that wounded or defeated us in daily life.
    LAWRENCE DURRELL
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Great art is the contempt of a great man for small art.
    F. SCOTT FITZGERALD
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • He is the true enchanter, whose spell operates, not upon the senses, but upon the imagination and the heart.
    WASHINGTON IRVING
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • I believe in the power of great art to transcend geographical boundaries, political differences and even the restrictions of time.
    ARMAND HAMMER
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • I know with certainty that a man's work is nothing but the long journey to recover, through the detours of art, the two or three simple and great images which first gained access to his heart.
    ALBERT CAMUS
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • I wonder whether art has a higher function than to make me feel, appreciate, and enjoy natural objects for their art value?
    BERNARD BERENSON
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • If you would have me weep, you must first of all feel grief yourself.
    HORACE
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • In art, as in love, instinct is enough.
    ANATOLE FRANCE
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • It depends little on the object, much on the mood, in art.
    EMERSON
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • It has been said that great art is the night thought of man. It may emerge without warning from the soundless depths of the unconscious, just as supernovas may blaze up suddenly in the farther reaches of void space.
    LOREN EISELEY
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Life is as the sea, art a ship in which man conquers life's crushing formlessness, reducing it to a course, a series of swells, tides and wind currents inscribed on a chart.
    RALPH ELLISON
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Life is very nice, but it lacks form. It's the aim of art to give it some.
    JEAN ANOUILH
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Life, the raw material, is only lived in potentia until the artist deploys it in his work.
    LAWRENCE DURRELL
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Nature scarcely ever gives us the very best; for that we must have recourse to art.
    BALTASAR GRACIÁN
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • No generation is interested in art in quite the same way as any other; each generation, like each individual, brings to the contemplation of art its own categories of appreciation, makes its own demands upon art, and has its own uses for art.
    T. S. ELIOT
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • No poet, no artist of any art, has his complete meaning alone. His significance, his appreciation is the appreciation of his relation to the dead poets and artists.
    T. S. ELIOT
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Nobody is fully alive who cannot apply to art as much discrimination and appreciation as he applies to the work by which he earns his living.
    BROOKS ATKINSON
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Nobody, I think, ought to read poetry, or look at pictures or statues, who cannot find a great deal more in them than the poet or artist has actually expressed.
    NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • One may do whate'er one likes
    In Art: the only thing is, to make sure
    That one does like it.
    ROBERT BROWNING
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • One who desires nothing, hopes for nothing, and fears nothing cannot be an artist.
    ANTON CHEKHOV
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Perhaps art is simply an organism's reaction against its retentive limitations.
    JOSEPH BRODSKY
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Picture and sculpture are the celebrations and festivities of form.
    EMERSON
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • The aim of every artist is to arrest motion, which is life, by artificial means and hold it fixed so that a hundred years later, when a stranger looks at it, it moves again since it is life.
    WILLIAM FAULKNER
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • The artist cannot get along without a public; and when the public is absent, what does he do? He invents it, and turning his back on his age, he looks toward the future for what the present denies.
    ANDRÉ GIDE
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • The artist has never been a dictator, since he understands better than anybody else the variations in human personality.
    HEYWOOD BROUN
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • The artist is the most interesting of all phenomena, for he represents creativity, the definition of man.
    ALLAN BLOOM
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • The artist's morality lies in the force and truth of his description.
    JULES BARBEY D'AUREVILLY
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • The artist's work constitutes the only satisfactory relationship he can have with his fellow men since he seeks his real friends among the dead and the unborn.
    LAWRENCE DURRELL
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • The artistic impulse seems not to wish to produce finished work. It certainly deserts us half-way, after the idea is born; and if we go on, art is labor.
    CLARENCE DAY
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • The attitude that nature is chaotic and that the artist puts order into it is a very absurd point of view, I think. All that we can hope for is to put some order into ourselves.
    WILLEM DE KOONING
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • The business of every art is to bring something into existence, and the practice of an art involves the study of how to bring into existence something which is capable of having such an existence and has its efficient cause in the maker and not in itself.
    ARISTOTLE
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • The dignity of the artist lies in his duty of keeping awake the sense of wonder in the world. In this long vigil he often has to vary his methods of stimulation; but in this long vigil he is also himself striving against a continual tendency to sleep.
    G. K. CHESTERTON
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • The fact that all of us die anyway (the rumor turns out to be true) is a mere detail in the celestial glow of imagination. The artist's eyes destroy death.
    HERBERT GOLD
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • The genuine artist is as much a dissatisfied person as the revolutionary, yet how diametrically opposed are the products each distills from his dissatisfaction.
    ERIC HOFFER
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • The true work of art is the one which the seventh wave of genius throws up the beach where the undertow of time cannot drag it back.
    CYRIL CONNOLLY
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • The work of art is a part of nature seen through a temperament.
    ANDRÉ GIDE
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • The work of art is the exaggeration of an idea.
    ANDRÉ GIDE
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • The youth of an art is, like the youth of anything else, its most interesting period.
    SAMUEL BUTLER
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • There is no better deliverance from the world than through art; and a man can form no surer bond with it than through art.
    GOETHE
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • There is no comfort in adversity
    More sweet than Art affords. The studious mind
    Poising in meditation, there is fixed,
    And sails beyond its troubles unperceiving.
    AMPHIS
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • There is no progress in art.
    ILYA EHRENBURG
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • To make us feel small in the right way is a function of art; men can only make us feel small in the wrong way.
    E. M. FORSTER
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • True art selects and paraphrases, but seldom gives a verbatim translation.
    THOMAS BAILEY ALDRICH
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • What critics often ask for is the impossible, though this may be a salutary means of extending the borders of art.
    ANTHONY BURGESS
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • What is more natural in a democratic age than that we should begin to measure the stature of a work of art - especially of a painting by how widely and how well it is reproduced?
    DANIEL J. BOORSTIN
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Without tradition, art is a flock of sheep without a shepherd. Without innovation, it is a corpse.
    SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
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  • ART AND ARTISTS
  • Wonder at the first sight of works of art may be the effect of ignorance and novelty; but real admiration and permanent delight in them are the growth of taste and knowledge.
    WILLIAM HAZLITT
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  • ARTEN
  • Wie ein jeder geartet ist, so red vnd tut er. - Petri, II, 789.
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  • ARTEN
  • Wie jedermann geartet sey, spürt man in Ehren vnnd Emptern frey. - Petri, II, 790.
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  • ARTHAFT
  • A thuot guor uoarthoffk. (Sprottau.) - Firmenich, I, 298, 14.
    info] Uoarthoffk = arthaftig, dass es eine (gute) Art hat.
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  • ARTIG
  • Artig und fein bringt viel ein. - Müller, 4, 2.
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  • ARTIG
  • Was artig ist, ist klein. - Eiselein, 42.
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  • ARTIGKEIT
  • Artigkeit geht vor Schönheit.
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  • ARTIGKEIT
  • Artigkeit ist ein schönes Kleid.
    Frz.:] La simple honnêteté est la meilleure politesse, et la tempérance le meilleur médecin.
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  • ARTIGKEIT
  • Artigkeit macht keinen Topf fett. (Lit.)
    info] Leere Worte helfen keine Speise kochen, glatte Worte nützen nichts in der Wirthschaft. Wer sich gut nähren will, muss arbeiten. (Wurzbach I, 467.)
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  • ARTIGKEIT
  • Eine Artigkeit erfordert die andere und eine Grobheit stösst die andere. (Schles.)
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  • ARTIGKEIT
  • Eine Artigkeit erfordert die andere, sagte das Weib zur Nachbarin, da warf sie ihr faule Äpfel ins Gesicht.
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  • ARTIKEL
  • Wer den Artikel Wahrheit sucht, muss sich kein Lexikon vom Teufel borgen.
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  • ARTILLERIST
  • Ein Artillerist muss nie in Verlegenheit kommen.
    info] Sprichwort der breslauer Artillerie.
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  • ARTISCHOCKEN
  • Da die Artischocken in großer Herren Gärten wuchsen, waren sie angenehm; jetzo da sie bey Bauern zu finden, helt man nichts darauf. - Lehmann, 716, 2.
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  • ARTISCHOCKEN
  • Wer immer Artischocken gegessen, sehnt sich nach Kartoffeln. (Moskau.) - Altmann V.
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  • ARTJE
  • Dat is Artjen vunt Va'rtjen, Ortjen vunt Mo'rtjen. - Eichwald, 64.
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