DICTUM

keywords Ar

  • ARCHIMANDRIT
  • Wenn der Archimandrit das Singen nicht liebt, so sind die Mönche heiser. (S. Abt 11.) - Altmann V.
  • 1
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • An arch never sleeps.
    HINDUSTANI PROVERB
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • Architecture is either the prophecy of an unformed society or the tomb of a finished one.
    LEWIS MUMFORD
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • Architecture is inhabited sculpture.
    CONSTANTIN BRANCUSI
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • Architecture is the art of organizing a mob of craftsmen. This, the original meaning of the word, expresses an essential fact ... the conceptions of an architect must be worked out by other hands and other minds than his own.
    GEOFFREY SCOTT
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • By early 1943, the Pentagon was complete - a building big enough to house forty thousand people and all their accoutrements, the largest building in the world, conceived, funded, designed and constructed in a little more than a year. And on the day it was finished, it was already too small.
    DAVID BRINKLEY
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • Ecbatana her structure vast there shows,
    And Hecatompylos her hundred gates.
    MILTON.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • Even the West has known the architecture of empty space, whose object, for thousands of years, has been less to construct divine houses, than to create sacred places, to seize upon mystery and to immerse man in it - whether by raising the cyclopean pedestal that surrounds him with stars, or by hollowing out the sanctuary that wraps him in haunted night.
    ANDRÉ MALRAUX
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • Firm Doric pillars found the solid base,
    The fair Corinthian crown the higher space,
    And all below is strength, and all above is grace.
    DRYDEN.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • His son builds on, and never is content
    Till the last farthing is in structure spent.
    DRYDEN.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • How rev'rend is the face of this tall pile,
    Whose ancient pillars rear their marble heads
    To bear aloft its arch'd and pond'rous roof!
    By its own weight made steadfast and immovable ;
    Looking tranquillity ! It strikes an awe
    And terror to my aching sight ! The tombs
    And monumental caves of death look cold,
    And shoot a dullness to my trembling heart.
    CONGREVE : Mourning Bride.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • I am sometimes visited by the heretical thought that there is no such thing as good and bad architecture, any more than there is good and bad nature. It is all in where you stand at the time.
    JOHN UPDIKE
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • I call architecture "petrified music." Really there is something in this; the tone of mind produced by architecture approaches the effect of music.
    GOETHE
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • If the design of the building be originally bad, the only virtue it can ever possess will be signs of antiquity.
    JOHN RUSKIN
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • In the well-framed models,
    With emblematic skill and mystic order,
    Thou show'dst where tow'rs on battlements should rise ;
    Where gates should open, or where walls should compass.
    PRIOR.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • Let my due feet never fail
    To walk the studious cloisters pale,
    And love the high embowed roof,
    With antique pillars massy proof;
    And storied windows richly dight,
    Casting a dim religious light.
    MILTON.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • Light, God's eldest daughter, is a principal beauty in a building.
    THOMAS FULLER
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • Lovely promise and quick ruin are seen nowhere better than in Gothic architecture.
    GEORGE SANTAYANA
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • No architecture is so haughty as that which is simple.
    JOHN RUSKIN
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • No building was safe from the furniture, the pictures, the human beings that it would presently contain.
    GRAHAM GREENE
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • No hammers fell, no ponderous axes rung ;
    Like some tall palm the mystic fabric sprung;
    Majestic silence !
    HEBER : Palestine.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • No person who is not a great sculptor or painter can be an architect. If he is not a sculptor or painter, he can only be a builder.
    JOHN RUSKIN
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • Of all forms of visible otherworldliness, it seems to me, the Gothic is at once the most logical and the most beautiful. It reaches up magnificently - and a good half of it is palpably useless.
    H. L. MENCKEN
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • Our fathers next, in architecture skill'd,
    Cities for use, and forts for safety build :
    Then palaces and lofty domes arose;
    These for devotion, and for pleasure those.
    SIR R. BLACKMORE.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • Rattling the bones is not architecture. Less is only more where more is no good.
    FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • Silently as a dream the fabric rose,
    No sound of hammer or of saw was there.
    COWPER : Task.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • The art of architecture studies not structure in itself, but the effect of structure on the human spirit.
    GEOFFREY SCOTT
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • The brevity of human life gives a melancholy to the profession of the architect.
    EMERSON
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • The genius of architecture seems to have shed its maledictions over this land.
    THOMAS JEFFERSON
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • The Golden Arches of McDonald's rise, glorious across the landscape, contempo-monolithic, simple in concept as Stonehenge if we could but see it.
    MAUREEN HOWARD
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • The growing tow'rs like exhalations rise,
    And the huge columns heave into the skies.
    POPE.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • The hasty multitude
    Admiring enter'd ; and the work some praise,
    And some the architect : his hand was known
    In heav'n by many a tower'd structure high ;
    Where sceptred angels held their residence,
    And sat as princes.
    MILTON.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • The job of the architect becomes more difficult in this secular age. Where once he had a god to extol, he now has humans like himself; where once he had "he," he now has "she" and "they."
    NIKKI GIOVANNI
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • There stands a structure of majestic frame.
    POPE.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • View not this spire by measures giv'n
    To buildings raised by common hands.
    PRIOR.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • We shape our buildings: thereafter they shape us.
    SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • Westward a pompous frontispiece appear'd,
    On Doric pillars of white marble rear'd,
    Crown'd with an architrave of antique mould,
    And sculpture rising on the roughen'd gold.
    POPE.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • When we build, let us think that we build for ever.
    JOHN RUSKIN
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • Whene'er we view some well-proportion'd dome.
    No single parts unequally surprise ;
    All comes united to th' admiring eyes.
    POPE.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • While fancy brings the vanish'd piles to view,
    And builds imaginary Rome anew.
    POPE.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • Windows and doors in nameless sculpture drest,
    With order, symmetry, or taste unblest ;
    Forms like some bedlam statuary's dream,
    The crazed creation of misguided whim.
    BURNS.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • With her the temple ev'ry moment grew,
    Upward the columns shoot, the roofs ascend,
    And arches widen, and long aisles ascend.
    POPE.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • You show us Rome was glorious, not profuse;
    And pompous buildings once were things of use.
    POPE.
  • 3
  • ARCHITECTURE
  • You too proceed ! make falling arts your care,
    Erect new wonders, and the old repair;
    Jones and Palladio to themselves restore,
    And be whate'er Vitruvius was before.
    POPE : To the Earl of Burlington.
  • 3
  • ARDIG
  • Ardig (rührig) wie eine Siegames (Ameise). (Bittburg.) - Boebel, 146.
  • 2
  • ARDÖRPER
  • Dat is de Ârdörpe hör Nôd; (se hebben) 's Winters gên Botter un 's Sömmers gên Brod. - Kern, 5.
    info] D.i. sie sind nicht haushälterisch, sie sparen keine Butter für den Winter und kein Korn für den Sommer.
  • 1
  • ARG
  • Arg denkt arg.
    It.:] Chi mal fa, mal pensa. (Pazzaglia, 278, 2.)
  • 1
  • ARG
  • Arg hat (lässt) ärger Kind. - Eiselein, 37.
    Dän.:] Ingen er saa arg at han finder jo en verre. (Prov. dan., 34.)
  • 1
  • ARG
  • Arg und karg sind die Weiber bis in den Sarg.
  • 1
  • ARG
  • Arg wider arg.
  • 1
  • ARG
  • Ärger ist offt besser worden. - Henisch, 324, 9.
  • 1
  • ARG
  • Es ist keiner so arg, er findet einen Ärgern.
    It.:] Non fu mai un si tristo, che non fosse un peggior di lui.
    Lat.:] Nemo omnium pessimus.
  • 1
  • ARG
  • Es ist nichts arger, dann ein böss Weib. - Eyering, II, 557.
  • 1
  • ARG
  • Es ist nie so arg gewesen, es ward wieder gut. - Petri, II, 273.
  • 1
  • ARG
  • Je ärger dat Stück, je better dat Glück. (Waldeck.) - Curtze, 393, 366.
  • 1
  • ARG
  • Je ärger die Menschen, je ärger die Zeiten.
  • 1
  • ARG
  • Je ärger, je besser.
  • 1
  • ARG
  • Was arg ist, wird besser.
  • 1
  • ARG
  • Was zu arg ist, ist zu arg, sagt Eduard Meyer in Hamburg.
    info] Ein Sprichwort Ludwig Börne's das er in seinen Briefen aus Paris (Thl. 5 u. 6) häufig gebraucht; so kommt es z.B. im 26. Briefe vor. Durch die vielgelesenen ist es auch in anderer Mund gekommen.
  • 1
  • ARG
  • Wer arg ist, denckt arg.
    Span.:] El malo siempre piensa engaño. (Bohn I, 218.)
  • 1
  • ARG
  • 'S ist ärger als der tolle Wrangel.
    info] Diese bei Gomolcke verzeichnete Redensart hat die Erinnerung an diesen schwedischen Feldherrn des Dreissigjährigen Krieges bewahrt.
  • 2
  • ARG
  • Berr sein ne a su ork uff da weecha Quork. (Hirschberg.)
    info] Die Sache interessirt uns sehr wenig.
  • 2
  • ARG
  • Das ist ärger als arg.
  • 2
  • ARG
  • Er ist so arg darauf wie ein Wolf aufs Heufressen. (Eifel.)
    info] Ironisch von jemand, dem die Arbeit sehr wenig am Herzen liegt.
  • 2
  • ARG
  • Es ist ärger, as d' Muetter ajenna. - Tobler, 31.
  • 2
  • ARG
  • Sie sind arg drauf wie die Aare.
  • 2
  • ARGE (DER)
  • Dem Argen ist alles arg.
  • 1
  • ARGE (DER)
  • Was der Arge fürchtet, das begegnet ihm. - Spr. Sal., 10, 24; Schulze, 54.
  • 1
  • ÄRGER
  • Ärger (Gram) bezahlt keine Schulden.
    Frz.:] Le chagrin ne paye pas de dettes.
  • 1
  • ÄRGER
  • Ärger verdirbt die Schönheit.
    Frz.:] Ennuy nuit, jour et nuit. (Gruter.)
  • 1
  • ÄRGER
  • De Ärger geit in kenen hâlen Bâm. - Schambach, 273.
    info] Der Ärger zehrt am Leben und wenn jemand lange geschwiegen, so braucht man sich nicht darüber zu wundern, wenn der Unmuth, der sich im Herzen gesammelt, hervorbricht, da der Ärger in keinen hohlen Baum geht.
  • 1
  • ÄRGER
  • Der erste Ärger ist besser, als der zweite. (S. Verdruss 3, Zorn 8.)
    Masur.:] Pierwszy gniew lepszy, niz dragi. (Frischbier, II, 3032.)
  • 1
  • ÄRGER
  • Im Ärger ist Wahrheit.
  • 1
  • ÄRGER
  • Wer keinen Ärger will han, bereite andern kein an.
  • 1
  • ÄRGER
  • Wer will Ärger ha'n, mische sich ein zwischen Frau und Mann.
  • 1
  • ÄRGER
  • Aus Ärger katholisch werden.
    info] Heinrich Heine sagt: »Dieses Sprichwort hat eine verflucht tiefe Bedeutung, die mir jetzt erst klar wird.« (vgl. Heinrich Heine über Ludwig Börne, Hamburg 1840, S. 286.)
  • 2
  • ÄRGER
  • Er möchte vor Ärger mit dem Arsch eine Nuss aufbeissen. (Rott.-Thal.)
  • 2
  • ÄRGERN
  • Ärger dich nicht; im Röhre stehn Klössel, du siehst se man nicht.
  • 1
  • ÄRGERN
  • Ärger in der Liebe, Pfeffer auf den Brei. (Rumänien.) - Neue Freie Presse, 4581.
    info] Man kann dadurch von beiden mehr geniessen.
  • 1
  • ÄRGERN
  • Ärger' di man nich, du könntest die rothe Rose kriegen. (Königsberg.)
  • 1
  • ÄRGERN
  • Ärger' die man nich, du kunnst de kôle Pöss ön (an) e Hacke krîge. - Frischbier, II, 115.
  • 1
  • ÄRGERN
  • Ärgere dich doch nicht so darüber, sagte Hans zu seiner Mutter, als er ein schlechtes Schulzeugniss heim gebracht hatte, ich mach' mir ja auch nichts daraus.
  • 1
  • ÄRGERN
  • Ärgere dich nicht über die Zeit und die Regierung. (It.)
  • 1
  • ÄRGERN
  • Ärgere dich nicht, du wirst sonst garstig. (Frankenwald.)
  • 1
  • ÄRGERN
  • Einer ärgert sich über das Licht (die Sonnenstrahlen), der ander über den Schatten.
    info] Die Türken: Der Schlächter ärgert sich übers Fettmachen, die Ziege übers Schlachten. (Weigel.)
  • 1
  • ÄRGERN
  • Man muss sich nicht ärgern über ein Kind, das unrein ist, noch über ein Pferd, das Läuse hat.
  • 1
  • ÄRGERN
  • Wer sich ärgert über geschehene Sachen, will einem Kinde einen andern Vater machen.
  • 1
  • ÄRGERN
  • Wer sich ärgert, gewinnt wenig.
  • 1
  • ÄRGERN
  • Wer sich ärgert, ist unglücklich.
    Engl.:] He that is angry is seldom at ease. (Bohn II, 1.)
  • 1
  • ÄRGERN
  • Wer sich über alles ärgern will, wird nicht fertig.
  • 1
  • ÄRGERN
  • Ärgascht die - nömm e Bätke Schwîndreck unda de Tung. (Natangen.) - Frischbier, I, 109.
  • 2
  • ÄRGERN
  • Ärger die erscht am drödde Dag. - Frischbier, I, 107.
  • 2
  • ÄRGERN
  • Ärgerst di öwer em? Freu di doch, dann argert he sich.
  • 2
  • ÄRGERN
  • Der hat mich schon manchmal geärgert.
    info] Beim Anblick des Herzkönigs im Kartenspiel.
  • 2
  • ÄRGERN
  • Er ärgert sich wie ein Auerhahn. (Troppau.)
  • 2
  • ÄRGERN
  • Er ärgert sich wie ein Truthahn. (Salzburg.)
  • 2
  • ÄRGERN
  • Er ärgert sich, dass die Donau nicht bei Berlin fliesst.
    info] Ueber etwas, das gar nicht zu ändern ist.
  • 2
  • ÄRGERN
  • Er ärgert sich, dass er sich nicht ärgern kann.
  • 2
  • ÄRGERN
  • Er soll sich ärgern, dass er roth wird. (Köthen.)
  • 2
  • ÄRGERN
  • Es ärgert ihn die Fliege an der Wand.
  • 2
  • <<< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 >>>

    alphabetical
    A-a A-b A-c A-d A-e A-f A-g A-h A-i
    A-j A-k A-l A-m A-n A-o A-p A-q
    A-r A-s A-t A-u A-v A-w A-y A-z
    Aa Ab Ac Ad Ae Af Ag Ah Ai Aj Ak Al Am
    An Ao Ap Aq Ar As At Au Av Aw Ax Ay Az
    Ba Be

    keywords
    Aa Ab Ac Ad Ae Af Ag Ah Ai Ak Al Am An Aq Ap Ar As At Au Av Aw Ax Az
    Ba Be

    DICTUM operone