Englische Weisheiten 6


Dance with the one who brought ya.

Dance with the one who brought you.

Dance with the one who brung ya.

Dance with the one who brung you.

Dancing on someone?s grave.
en] Idiom

Dancing on someone's grave.
en] To outlive someone and be happy that they are gone.

Daniel come to judgement.
en] Phrase

Darby and Joan.
en] Phrase

Dark Horse.
en] Idiom

Dark horse.
en] Phrase

Darken Someone's Door (Step).
en] Idiom

Darling Buds of May.
en] Idiom

Darling buds of May.
en] Phrase

Dash to pieces.
en] Phrase

Date rape.
en] Idiom

Date rape.
en] Phrase

Davy Jones' locker.
en] Phrase

Davy Jones's locker.
en] Idiom

Day in the sun.
en] A moment in time when one gets attention and is appreciated.

Day in the sun.
en] Idiom

Day surgery.
en] Idiom

Daylight robbery.
en] Phrase

Daylight saving time.
en] Idiom

Days are numbered.
en] Idiom

Days are numbered.
en] When someone or something is at the risk of coming to an end-

Dead Ahead.
en] Idiom

Dead as a dodo.
en] Phrase

Dead as a doornail.
en] Phrase

Dead as the Dodo.
en] Idiom

Dead cat bounce.
en] Phrase

Dead End Job.
en] Idiom

Dead end.
en] A situation that has no potential to go anywhere.

Dead end.
en] Idiom

Dead Eye.
en] Idiom

Dead from the neck up.
en] Idiom

Dead Heat.
en] Idiom

Dead in the water.
en] Phrase

Dead men can tell no tales.

Dead men tell no tales.

Dead of Winter.
en] Idiom

Dead ringer.
en] A duplicate or replica.

Dead ringer.
en] Idiom

Dead ringer.
en] Phrase

Dead Run.
en] Idiom

Dead Shot.
en] Idiom

Dead to the World.
en] Idiom

Dead to the world.
en] When someone is in a deep sleep and totally unaware what is going on around them.

Dead white European male.
en] Idiom

Deaf men go away with the injury.

Deal gently with the bird you mean to catch.

Dear John letter.
en] A letter written, usually from a woman to a man, explaining why they are ending the relationship.

Dear John letter.
en] Idiom

Death is the great leveller.

Death keeps no Kalender.

Death warmed over.
en] Idiom

Death warmed over.
en] To look very sick.

Debbie loves to dish the dirt on her enemies..
en] For goodMeaning:

Deceased versus Diseased.
en] Confusing Words

Deeds are fruits, words are but leaves.

Deeds are males, and words are females.
it] I fatti sono maschi, le parole femine.

Deep calls to deep.

Deep pockets but short arms.
en] Idiom

Deep pockets but short arms.
en] When someone has a lot of money but never seems to spend it.

Deep Pockets.
en] Idiom

Deep-Seated versus Deep-Seeded.
en] Confusing Words

Deer in headlights.
en] Idiom

Deer in headlights.
en] When someone is caught by surprise and needs to quickly make a decision but cannot react quick enough.

Defence versus Defense.
en] Confusing Words

Defendant versus Plaintiff.
en] Confusing Words

Defuse versus Diffuse.
en] Confusing Words

Deliver the Goods.
en] Idiom

Delusions of grandeur.
en] Phrase

Dependent versus Dependant.
en] Confusing Words

Depository versus Repository.
en] Confusing Words

Derring-do.
en] Idiom

Derring-do.
en] Phrase

Desert and reward seldom keep company.

Designated driver.
en] Idiom

Designer stubble.
en] Phrase

Desires are nourished by delays.

Desperate times call for desperate measures.

Desperate times require desperate measures.

Deus ex machina.
en] Phrase

Device versus Devise.
en] Confusing Words

Devil and the deep blue sea.
en] Phrase

Devil is in the details vs. God is in the detail.
en] Idiom

Devil is in the details.

Devil lies in the details.

Devil Takes the Hindmost.
en] Idiom

Devil?s advocate.
en] Idiom

Devil's Advocate.
en] Idiom

Devil's advocate.
en] Phrase

Devil's advocate.
en] Someone plays the devil's advocate when they take a position they do not agree with.

Dial down.
en] Idiom

Dialog versus Dialogue.
en] Confusing Words

Diamond in the rough.
en] Idiom

Diamond in the rough.
en] Phrase

Diamonds are a girl's best friend.

Diamonds cut diamonds.

Dice versus Die.
en] Confusing Words

Dicky Dirt.
en] Idiom

Die down.
en] Gradually come to an end.

Die down.
en] Idiom

Die of boredom.
en] Idiom

Die of boredom.
en] To be extremely bored.

Die-hard.
en] Phrase

Different From versus Different Than.
en] Confusing Words

Different from, different than, different to.
en] Idiom

Different kettle of fish.
en] Phrase

Different strokes for different folks.

Differently abled.
en] Phrase

Dig deep.
en] Idiom

Dig in your heels.
en] Refuse to compromise or change your mind.

Dilly Dally.
en] Idiom

Dilly Dally.
en] To waste time by being slow or not making a decision.

Diner versus Dinner.
en] Confusing Words

Dirt bag.
en] Phrase

Dirt cheap.
en] Idiom

Dirty Look.
en] Idiom

Disc versus Disk.
en] Confusing Words

Discreet versus Discrete.
en] Confusing Words

Discreet women have neither eyes nor ears.
fr] La femme de bien n'a ny yeux ny oreilles.

Discretion is the better part of valor.

Discretion is the better part of valour.

Discussing Uganda.
en] Idiom

Diseases are the interests of pleasures.

Dish the dirt.
en] Idiom

Disinterested versus Uninterested.
en] Confusing Words

Disorganized versus Unorganized.
en] Confusing Words

Disperse versus Disburse.
en] Confusing Words

Dissatisfied versus Unsatisfied.
en] Confusing Words

Distance lends enchantment to the view.

Dived versus Dove.
en] Confusing Words

Diversity of humours breedeth tumors.

DNA versus RNS.
en] Confusing Words

Do 12-Ounce Curls.
en] Idiom

Do as I say, not as I do.

Do as the Frier saith, not as he doeth.

Do as you would be done by.

Do good to all men, and enjoy life's sweetest pleasure.

Do not buy either the moon or the news, for in the end they will both come out.

Do not have the things that are written in this book in theory only, but put them into practice.

Do not play with edged tools.

Do not say go but gaw (go thy self along).

Do not wait for cheerfulness to come to you; go after it, retain it, never let it go; it is life's greatest medicine.

Do something at the drop of a hat.
en] Idiom

Do the trick.
en] Cause the desired results.

Do unto others as you would have them do to you.

Do unto others as you would have them do to you.
en] Phrase

Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
en] Idiom

Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
i] Based on the Bible (Matthew 7:12; Luke 6:31)

Do versus Due.
en] Confusing Words

Do what thou oughtest, and come what can.

Do your level best and you will have nothing to fear; put the best material in whatsoever you do, and you will create a power that nothing can o'erthrow, and though all the world should try to condemn yet you can look it square in the face, for nothing can throw you off your mental balance; but stand sure, firm, and unshaken.

Dock your pay.
en] Phrase

Doctors make the worst patients.

Dodge a Bullet.
en] Idiom

Dodge the bullet.
en] Idiom

Dodge the bullet.
en] To successfully avoid a big problem.

Does Macy's tell Gimbel's.

Doesn't Amount to a Hill of Beans.
en] Idiom

Doesn't know shit from Shinola.
en] Phrase

Doff your hat.
en] Phrase

Dog and bone.
en] Idiom

Dog days of summer.
en] Idiom

Dog Days of the Summer.
en] Idiom

Dog days.
en] Idiom

Dog days.
en] Phrase

Dog days.
en] The hottest days of the year.

Dog in the Manger.
en] Idiom

Dog in the manger.
en] Phrase

Dog-and-Pony Show.
en] Idiom

Dog-Eat-Dog.
en] Idiom

Dogs bark, but the caravan moves on.

Dog's bollocks.
en] Phrase

Dog's breakfast.
en] Phrase

Dog's dinner.
en] Phrase

Dogs gnaw bones because they cannot swallow them.

Dogs wag their tails not so much in love to you as to your bread.

Dollars to doughnuts.
en] Phrase

Don?t Count Your Chickens Before They Hatch.
en] Idiom

Don?t Cry Over Spilt Milk.
en] Idiom

Don?t Cut Off Your Nose to Spite Your Face.
en] Idiom

Don?t Have a Cow Over It.
en] Idiom

Don?t hold your breath.
en] Idiom

Don?t put all your eggs in one basket.
en] Idiom

Don?t quit your day job.
en] Idiom

Don?t sweat the small stuff.
en] Idiom

Don?t upset the apple cart.
en] Idiom

Done a runner.
en] Phrase

Done to a turn.
en] Phrase

Donkey's years.
en] Idiom

Donkey's years.
en] Phrase

Don't bark if you can't bite.

Don't be afraid to trust thyself, have confidence and faith in your own God given abilities.

Don't beat a dead horse.
en] Idiom

Don't bite off more than you can chew.

Don't bite the hand that feeds you.

Don't bite the hand that feeds you.
en] Idiom

Don't burn the candle at both ends.

Don't burn your bridges behind you.

Don't call us, we'll call you.
en] Phrase

Don't carry coals to Newcastle.

Don't cast your pearls before swine.

Don't change a winning team.

Don't change horses in midstream.

Don't change horses in midstream.
en] Phrase

Don't count your chickens before the eggs have hatched.

Don't count your chickens before the eggs have hatched.
en] Idiom

Don't count your chickens before they are hatched.

Don't count your chickens before they are hatched.
en] Phrase

Don't count your chickens before they hatch.
en] Idiom

Don't count your chickens before they're hatched.

Don't criticize someone before you walk a mile in their moccasins.

Don't cross a bridge before you come to it.

Don't cross the bridge till you come to it.

Don't cry over spilled milk.

Don't Cry Over Spilled Milk.
en] Idiom

Don't cry over spilt milk.
en] Idiom

Don't cut off your nose to spite your face.

Don't depend upon others to do your thinking be original and carry out your own ideas.

Don't die like I did.
en] Phrase

Don't dip your pen in company ink.

Don't drive faster than your guardian angel can fly.

Don't drop the soap.

Don't fall before you're pushed.

Don't get mad, get even.

Don't get your meat where you get your bread.

Don't give up the day job.
en] Idiom

Don't give up your day job.
en] Idiom

Don't go between the tree and the bark.

Don't go there.
en] Phrase

Don't hate the player, hate the game.

Don't have a clue.
en] Phrase

Don't have too many irons in the fire.

Don't hold your breath.
en] Don't wait or expect for something to happen that will likely never happen.

Don't judge a book by its cover.

Don't judge a book by its cover.
en] Don't make a decision based on a brief impression or outward appearance.

Don't Judge a Book by Its Cover.
en] Idiom

Don't keep a dog and bark yourself.

Don't keep a dog and bark yourself.
en] Phrase

Don't know shit from Shinola.
en] Phrase

Don't leave your manners on the doorstep.

Don't let the bastards grind you down.

Don't let the bastards grind you down.
en] Phrase

Don't let the cat out of the bag.

Don't let the grass grow under your feet.

Don't let your enemies bother you, for your own peace of mind, or they will rob you of your peaceful possession.

Don't look a gift horse in the mouth.

Don't look a gift horse in the mouth.
en] Idiom

Don't look a gift horse in the mouth.
en] Phrase

Don't make a mountain out of a molehill.

Don't make clothes for a not yet born baby.

Don't meet troubles half-way.

Don't mend what ain't broken.

Don't mix business with pleasure.

Don't put all your eggs in one basket.

Don't put all your eggs in one basket.
en] Don't put all of your resources in one single thing that could be lost or damaged.

Don't put all your eggs in one basket.
en] Idiom

Don't put new wine into old bottles.

Don't put the cart before the horse.

Don't rock the boat.

Don't shit in your own nest.

Don't shit where you eat.

Don't shoot the messenger.

Don't shut the stable door after the horse has bolted.

Don't shut the stable door after the horse has bolted.
en] Phrase

Don't spoil the ship for a ha'porth of tar.

Don't sweat the small stuff.

Don't take any wooden nickels.

Don't teach your Grandma to suck eggs.

Don't throw good money after bad.

Don't throw good money after bad.
en] Phrase

Don't throw pearls to swine.

Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater.

Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater.
en] Phrase

Don't trust anyone over thirty.

Don't try to run before you can walk.

Don't try to teach grandma how to suck eggs.

Don't try to teach your Grandma to suck eggs.
en] Phrase

Don't try to walk before you can crawl.

Don't upset the apple cart.
en] Don't mess up something that is going well.

Don't upset the apple-cart.

Don't wash your dirty linen in public.

Doom and Gloom.
en] Idiom

Doom and gloom.
en] Phrase

Doozy.
en] Idiom

Doozy.
en] Something extraordinary or spectacular.

Double cross.
en] Phrase

Double denim.
en] Idiom

Double Dutch.
en] Phrase

Double entendre.
en] Phrase

Double header.
en] Idiom

Double whammy.
en] Idiom

Double whammy.
en] Phrase

Double-Dip.
en] Idiom

Double-Edged Sword.
en] Idiom

Doubt is the beginning not the end of wisdom.

Doubting Thomas.
en] Idiom

Doubting Thomas.
en] Someone who rarely believes something without proof.

Doughnut versus Donut.
en] Confusing Words

Down and out.
en] Without money and without prospects.

Down at heel.
en] Phrase

Down in the doldrums.
en] Idiom

Down in the doldrums.
en] To lack energy and be depressed.

Down in the Dumps.
en] Idiom

Down in the dumps.
en] Phrase

Down in the dumps.
en] To be depressed.

Down the drain.
en] Idiom

Down the drain.
en] Wasted, lost.

Down the hatch.
en] Idiom

Down the pan.
en] Phrase

Down the pike vs. down the pipe.
en] Idiom

Down the pike.
en] Idiom

Down the Road.
en] Idiom

Down the tubes.
en] Phrase

Down to a T.
en] Idiom

Down to earth.
en] Practical and sensible.

Down to the wire.
en] Idiom

Down to the wire.
en] Phrase

Downer.
en] Idiom

Downer.
en] Something that happens that causes sadness.

Drag One's Feet (or Heels).
en] Idiom

Drag race.
en] Phrase

Drag your feet.
en] Deliberately hold back or delay.

Drag Your Feet.
en] Idiom

Drag your feet.
en] To procrastinate or purposely take longer than needed to complete a task.

Dragged through a hedge backwards.
en] Phrase

Dragged versus Drug.
en] Confusing Words

Drain the Lizard.
en] Idiom

Drank versus Drunk.
en] Confusing Words

Drastic times call for drastic measures.
en] Idiom

Draught versus Draft.
en] Confusing Words

Draw a blank.
en] Be unable to remember anything.

Draw a Blank.
en] Idiom

Draw a blank.
en] Phrase

Draw a Line in the Sand.
en] Idiom

Draw a Line Under (Something).
en] Idiom

Draw a Long Bow.
en] Idiom

Draw the Line.
en] Idiom

Draw your horns in.
en] Phrase

Dreamed versus Dreamt.
en] Confusing Words

Dreams of empire.
en] Phrase

Dress someone down.
en] Idiom

Dressed to the nines.
en] Idiom

Dressed to the nines.
en] Phrase

Dressed to the nines.
en] When someone is dressed in fashionable clothes.

Dressed Up to the Nines.
en] Idiom

Dribs and drabs.
en] Idiom

Drier versus Dryer.
en] Confusing Words

Drink like a fish.
en] Idiom

Drink like a fish.
en] Phrase

Drink like a fish.
en] To drink heavily.

Drink the Kool-Aid.
en] Idiom

Drive a Hard Bargain.
en] Idiom

Drive a hard bargain.
en] To be firm and strong in negotiation.

Drive a Wedge Between.
en] Idiom

Drive a wedge.
en] Idiom

Drive for show, putt for dough.

Drive someone up the wall.
en] Idiom

Drive someone up the wall.
en] When someone or something really irritates a person.

Driving while black.
en] Phrase

Drop a bombshell.
en] Idiom

Drop a bombshell.
en] To announce important and/or shocking news that will drastically change the current situation

Drop a Line.
en] Idiom

Drop off versus Drop-off.
en] Confusing Words

Drop out.
en] Quit school or withdraw from competition.

Drop someone a line.
en] Idiom

Drop someone a line.
en] To send someone a letter or message.

Drop the Ball.
en] Idiom

Drop the ball.
en] To be at fault for a failure of some kind.

Drop the subject.
en] Idiom

Drop the subject.
en] To stop discussing something entirely.

Drop-dead gorgeous.
en] Phrase

Dropped like a hot potato.
en] Idiom

Dropped like a hot potato.
en] To instantly discontinue or disassociate from someone or something.

Dropping like flies.
en] Idiom

Dropping like flies.
en] Phrase

Dropping like flies.
en] When a large group of people get hurt, become sick, or pass away all in a short span of time.

Drown one?s sorrows.
en] Idiom

Drown one's sorrows.
en] To drink alcohol, get drunk to forget about problems.

Drummed out of the army.
en] Phrase

Dry as a bone.
en] Idiom

Dry as a bone.
en] Used to emphasize that something is really dry.

Dry bread at home is better then roastmeat abroad.

Dry run.
en] Idiom

Dry spell.
en] Idiom

Dry spell.
en] When something is abnormally unsuccessful for a period of time.

Dual versus Duel.
en] Confusing Words

Ducks and drakes.
en] Phrase

Ducks in a row.
en] Idiom

Ducks in a row.
en] to be well organized.

Dumb blonde.
en] Phrase

Duplicate versus Replicate.
en] Confusing Words

Dust up.
en] Phrase

Dutch Courage.
en] Idiom

Dutch courage.
en] Phrase

Dutch Uncle.
en] Idiom

Duty Bound.
en] Idiom

Duvet day.
en] Idiom

Duvet day.
en] Phrase

Dwarfs versus Dwarves.
en] Confusing Words

Dwell not upon thy weariness, thy strength shall be according to the measure of thy desire.

Dyed in the wool.
en] Idiom

Dyed-In-The-Wool (adj.).
en] Idiom

Dying versus Dieing.
en] Confusing Words

E pluribus unum..

Each generation criticizes the unconscious assumptions made by its parents. It may assent to them, but it brings them out into the open.
Alfred North Whitehead (1861 - 1947)

Each to his own taste.
fr] Chacun ses gots.
fr] chacun son got.

Each to his own.

Each to their own.

Eager beaver.
en] Idiom

Eager beaver.
en] Someone who is hard working and enthusiastic about what they do.

Eagle eyes.
en] Idiom

Eagle eyes.
en] When one has an incredible attention to detail.

Eagle-Eyed.
en] Idiom

Ear candy.
en] Phrase

Ear popping.
en] Idiom

Early Bird [noun or adjective].
en] Idiom

Early bird catches the worm.

Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
en] Phrase

Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.

Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.

Earmark something.
en] Idiom

Earmark something.
en] To reserve or assign something for a specific use.

Ear-mark.
en] Phrase

Earn Your Stripes.
en] Idiom

Earn your stripes.
en] To prove yourself and skills at something.

Easier said than done.
en] Idiom

Easier said than done.
en] Used to describe something that is significantly easier to talk about, or sounds easy.

East is east, and west is west.

East, west, home's best.

Easy as pie.
en] Idiom

Easy as pie.
en] Phrase

Easy as pie.
en] Very easily completed or accomplished.

Easy come, easy go.

Easy come, easy go.
en] Easily won and easily lost.

Easy Come, Easy Go.
en] Idiom

Easy does it.
en] A phrase used when one wants something done slow and carefully.

Easy does it.
en] Idiom

Easy money.
en] Idiom

Easy money.
en] Money that is earned with little effort.

Easy on the ear.
en] Idiom

Easy on the eyes.
en] Attractive, pleasant looking.

Easy on the eyes.
en] Attractive.

Easy on the Eyes.
en] Idiom

Easy-peasy.
en] Idiom

Eat (someone) out of house and home.
en] Idiom

Eat (someone) out of house and home.
en] When some one eats large volumes of food.

Eat Crow.
en] Idiom

Eat dirt.
en] Idiom

Eat drink and be merry.
en] Phrase

Eat Humble Pie.
en] Idiom

Eat humble pie.
en] Phrase

Eat humble pie.
en] When one has to admit they were wrong about something.

Eat into one?s savings.
en] Idiom

Eat into one's savings.
en] When you begin to use money saved for something in the future.

Eat like a bird.
en] Eat very little.

Eat like a bird.
en] Idiom

Eat like a horse.
en] Idiom

Eat my hat.
en] Idiom

Eat my hat.
en] Phrase

Eat my hat.
en] Said when one doesn't believe that something can happen.

Eat one?s words.
en] Idiom

Eat out of someones hand.
en] Idiom

Eat out of someones hand.
en] To do anything a person asks without question out of eagerness to please.

Eat someone alive.
en] Idiom

Eat someone for breakfast.
en] Idiom

Eat Someone's Lunch.
en] Idiom

Eat to live, not live to eat.

Eat whatever thou likest, but dress as others do.

Eat whatever you like, but dress as others do.

Eat Your Heart Out!.
en] Idiom

Eat your own dog food.

Eat, drink and be merry for tomorrow we die.

Eat, drink and be merry, for tomorrow we die.

Eat, drink and be merry.

Eat, sleep, and breathe (something).
en] Idiom

Eat, sleep, and breathe (something).
en] To be very passionate and think about something constantly.

Eatable versus Edible.
en] Confusing Words

Eaten bread is soon forgotten.

Eaten out of house and home.
en] Phrase

Economical with the truth.
en] Idiom

Economical with the truth.
en] Phrase

Economy has frequently nothing whatever to do with the amount of money being spent, but with the wisdom used in spending it.
Henry Ford (1863 - 1947)

Edge of one?s seat.
en] Idiom

Education is a progressive discovery of our own ignorance.

Eeny, meeny, miny, mo.
en] Phrase

Effective versus Efficient.
en] Confusing Words

Efficacy versus Efficiency.
en] Confusing Words

Efficiency versus Effectiveness.
en] Confusing Words

Egg on Your Face.
en] Idiom

Egg on your face.
en] To be embarrassed.

Egg on.
en] Phrase

Egg someone on.
en] Idiom

Egg someone on.
en] To encourage someone to do something, usually not in their best interest.

Ego trip.
en] An act that draws the attention to oneself to display one's importance.

Ego trip.
en] Idiom

Eighty six.
en] Idiom

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DEUTSCH
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FRANZÖSISCH
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ITALIENISCH
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LATEINISCH
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PORTUGIESISCH
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SPANISCH
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